menstruation & drugs
 

Drug abuse and addiction can lead to serious problems throughout the body, especially over time.

Along with damage to internal organs and changes in the brain, these substances may also lead to issues with normal body functioning and processes, including possibly your period.

How Abused & Illegal Drugs Affect Your Period

Every woman’s body is different. Some women have irregular menstrual cycles to begin with, but substance use can make these problems worse or more pronounced. Just like how some prescription drugs and medications can interfere with your menstrual cycle, illicit drugs or abused drugs may have similar and in some cases, serious effects on your period and reproductive health.

Cocaine & Your Period

One of the more common illicit drugs that affects your period is cocaine. Cocaine use, especially regular cocaine use, may disrupt the menstrual cycle, interfere with sex hormone levels, and stop ovulation altogether.1 This means that a cocaine addict could go several months without a regular period or not get their period at all. Prolonged cocaine abuse may also cause damage to the fallopian tubes that can make conceiving a child later more difficult.1 Because of this risk, admission to a cocaine detox center sooner rather than later could save you from heartache down the road.

Opioids & Your Period

With the opioid epidemic, the United States has seen a rise in people misusing and abusing everything from prescription painkillers to synthetic opioids like heroin. This class of drugs is dangerous for several reasons, including how they may affect your menstruation. Chronic heroin use can lead to irregular periods2 and some opioids can impact your flow as well lead to heavier or lighter periods.3

Alcohol & Your Period

While drugs affect your period in different ways, alcohol consumption may also impact your menstrual cycle. While research on the topic is still limited, some studies suggest that women who are addicted to alcohol may experience disruptions in their menstrual cycle such as changes in sex hormone levels as well as irregular periods.4 Alcoholism treatment could diminish or reverse some of these problems.

Everyone is different. Whether or not doing drugs affects your period will depend on several factors including the drug being abused, frequency of abuse, length of addiction, interaction with other drugs or medications, hormones, and reproductive health.

Regulating Your Period After Drug Abuse

Because doing drugs can affect your period as well as your reproductive health, if you are experiencing any abnormalities with your period, you should talk to your gynecologist immediately. Some of these problems could be signs of more serious issues or lead to fertility problems down the line. Your doctor will be able to investigate these problems further and develop a treatment plan if necessary.

In some cases, regulating your menstrual cycle may be as simple as stopping your drug abuse. It may take a few months for your body to adjust after getting sober and your period to get back to normal, but it could be all you need. We understand that this may be easier said than done, so our drug detox center in Illinois helps you quit in a safer and more comfortable manner than trying to do so on your own. You will also be under the care of medical professionals who will monitor you and address any problems.



No matter what substance you are abusing, you should get help. At Banyan Heartland, we want to help you build a life that is free of drugs and alcohol. To begin your journey or just to get more information, call now at 888-280-4763.


Sources:

  1. Vice - How Do Illegal Drugs Affect Women’s Fertility?
  2. NIH - What are the medical complications of chronic heroin use?
  3. WebMd - Could My Meds Affect My Period?
  4. Oxford Academic - MENSTRUAL CYCLE IN WOMEN ADDICTED TO ALCOHOL DURING THE FIRST WEEK FOLLOWING DRINKING CESSATION—CHANGES OF SEX HORMONES LEVELS IN RELATION TO SELECTED CLINICAL FEATURES
 
Alyssa
Alyssa
Alyssa is Banyan’s Director of Digital Marketing & Technology. After overcoming her own struggles with addiction, she began working in the treatment field in 2012. She graduated from Palm Beach State College in 2016 with additional education in Salesforce University programs. A part of the Banyan team since 2016, Alyssa brings over 5 years of experience in the addiction treatment field.